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Six Facts About Fibroids In SA Women

We shared a newsworthy article about why you can and should wear white. Here we give you some more information about a common problem women face: fibroids.

Tanika Gray Valbrun, the founder of The White Dress Project, is on a mission to teach women about fibroids and how these impact a women’s reproductive health. By wearing white, you share strength, courage and perseverance with all women. According to Fibroids website, “Uterine fibroids (also known as leiomyomas), are benign (non-cancerous) tumours, that can be found in the smooth muscle layer (myometrium) of 20 to 40 percent of women aged 35 and older. These tumours are in most cases asymptomatic, but can in extreme cases lead to a number of symptoms” such as heavy and painful periods, fertility and pregnancy problems, backache and painful sexual intercourse.

Related article: We Can Wear White!

Tanika Gray Valbrun of the The White Dress Project shares six facts about fibroids in relation to South African women:

  1. Fibroids have been found to affect 20% to 40% of South African women. This number may well be conservative, as many women go undiagnosed.
  2. Women aged between 30 and 50 years are most likely to develop fibroids.
  3. More women are presenting with fibroids, as there is increased awareness about the condition as well as increased access to medical imaging (which has improved over the years).
  4. Approximately 10 000 hysterectomies are performed annually in the private sector in South Africa, the majority of which are for fibroid disease. There are no definitive statistics for the government sector, but the numbers are thought to be substantially more.
  5. It has been shown that fibroids are much more aggressive in African women. They appear in a younger age group and cause more significant symptoms, which may be why the burden is more significant in African countries and, sadly, why many women still suffer unnecessarily.
  6. 50% of the visitors to the Fibroids website are men, looking for information and understanding on the subject and to help their partners find relief.

Source: Networx PR for The White Dress Project

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