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Human trafficking is commonly understood to be the movement of people normally for the purposes of forced labour or commercial sexual exploitation. But what if you were told that it is far more prevalent, complex and closer to home or around you than you realised?

Noy Thrupkaew, a global journalist who reports on human traffricking and the economics of exploitation through the lens of labour rights uses TED Talk to share her findings on the human trafficking investigations she has conducted. According to Thrupkaew, we always assume that a human trafficking is a bad man doing bad things to an innocent girl or forced prostitution; yet, it is seamlessly embedded in our daily lives.

She explains how it mainly occurs in the agriculture, domestic and construction work sectors; these are people who create goods and deliver services that most of us rely on – they are underpaid and exploited. Thrupkaew says that trafficking occurs in sectors where workers are excluded from labour protections and it happens in a systematic working enviroment.

She reveals the flourishing human trafficking in the US, Europe and developing countries and exposes “human faces behind exploited labour that feeds global consumers.”

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