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If you identify with the signs of having FOMO, we have a few ideas on how to free yourself from the grips of this worldwide phenomenon.

According to Linda and Charlie Bloom, who are considered experts in the field of relationships, FOMO (fear of missing out) plagues a growing portion of the population – people who either overcommit and fail to fulfill many of their commitments, or who choose to avoid agreements and commitments as much as possible. The Blooms explain that a person’s action or inaction in the case of FOMO is motivated by “fear that in making an agreement they are losing the chance to engage in other experiences that could result in greater personal gratification or satisfaction.”

Psychologytoday.com suggests the following steps to release you from the restrictions of FOMO, to enhance your wellbeing and the quality of your relationships.

  1. Take your time. Yes, life is fast-paced, but you need to slow down and take your time when you eat, drive, talk or engage in any other activity.
  2. Learn to say no. Differentiate between what is more important, and what is not. If it doesn’t benefit you in anyway, just say NO! This will allow you to dedicate your time to things that are more beneficial to your life.
  3. Go for fun and not for status. Of course there will always be people we admire or envy, but make sure that whatever you do, you’re doing it for the experience, networking or connecting on a personal level – there is more to life than just being seen with the ‘right’ people.
  4. Accept that you can’t have it all. Learn to differentiate between needs and wants; the former are limited and desires are endless. You can’t always fulfill all your desires, so prioritise what’s important to you.
  5. One thing at a time. It is okay to multitask, but you don’t always have to do it. Your brain can only respond to one action request at a time. Focusing on a single task will ensure that you give it your full attention and that you produce a higher quality end result.
  6. Be mindful. Pay very close attention to what you’re chasing; is it genuine happiness or just an illusion?
  7. Invest in relationships over benefits. Quality relationships are good for your wellbeing; therefore, ensure they come first before possessions and impromptu experiences.

Source: Psychology Today

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